How To Design Your Brand Logo [Part Two]: Creating Customer Profiles

This is something I’ve been lagging on, even though it is really simple to do.

At least it’s not terribly complicated.

We are going to help our ideal customers, followers, subscribers and fans get dates!

Just kidding!

But the easiest way to think of your relationship with your customers is to develop an understanding of what makes them: desirable, familiar, and novel. Let me put that into context.

  • Desirable: This section is about needs and benefits. What is it that they or their business can provide us that is a need for us or our business? This is a section where being blunt with yourself is key. Be honest about the kind of customer you need and remember that customers are people and need to feel desired.
  • Familiar This is about connection. What do you have in common? What are topics that you can discuss? What are places and events that you both visit? Proximity and familiarity are powerful forces when it comes to connecting with customers. Just by being close to a prospect increases your chance of making sale, and having things in common results in more meaningful interactions.
  • Novel:  This is all about what we can provide. What is that we provide that is unique to us? What unique problem are we capable of solving. This section may sound scary, but if you have taken your time with the previous sections this one will have some pleasant surprises for you.

Why does figuring these out matters? Because exercises such as these allow us to establish boundaries and protocols for our customer relationships. More importantly, good customer relationships can be a powerful source of learning, innovation, and opportunities.

Important! As you create the profiles mark where there are similarities between profiles. Finding common grounds is what we care about.

So what does it look like in action? Well these are the profiles I created for two of my targets customers. As a personal preference I tend to create Archetypes than list the customers that closely fit the profile. This is purely for the purpose of streamlining.

Disclaimer

The following parts are my personal thoughts and opinion and based around my goals. 

Photographers

(DIY Creators, Artists)

  • Desirable:
    • The saturation of their field requires creative ways of standing out on social media and online.
    • They network consistently and dependent on referrals which is time consuming.
    • They are likely to be interested in photo books, physical portfolios and cards.
    • They require affordable and streamlined solutions to creating and publishing visual content for multiple social media channels.
  • Familiar: 
    • I am familiar with the different software that they use and the challenges and rewards of photo editing and location shooting.
    • I can critique someone’s work based on composition, lighting, balance, and subject matter.
    • As a freelancer I share many of the problems that they encounter on the business side.
  • Novel:
    • I can provide tutorials and guides to make the process of networking and getting referrals easier based on my experience as a marketing manager, designer and programmer.
    • I can offer my services for additional help and more advanced projects.
    • I can help them get exposure.
    • I can help them diversify their streams of income.

Bloggers

(Novelists)

  • Desirable
    • The saturation of their field requires creative ways of standing out on social media and online. (Same as a Photographer)
    • They have a ‘servant leadership’ mentality where they focus on building a reputation based on creating value for the subscribers.
    • They require affordable and streamlined solutions to creating and publishing visual content for multiple social media channels.(Same as a Photographer)
    • Building reputation through collaboration is an active part of the blogging culture.
  • Familar: 
    • I am familiar with the different software that they use and the challenges and rewards of creating content, publishing, and growing traffic. (Same as a Photographer)
    • I blog about several popular topics including: Entrepreneurship, photography, health, personal development and creativity. (Same as a Photographer)
    • I can critique someone’s work based on composition, lighting, balance, and subject matter.  (Same as a Photographer)
    • As a blogger I share many of the problems that they encounter on the business side.(Same as a Photographer)
  • Novel:
    • I can provide tutorials and guides to make the process of networking and getting referrals easier based on my experience as a marketing manager, designer and programmer. (Same as a Photographer)
    • I can develop materials that they can share with their subscribers.
    • I can help them diversify their streams of income. (Same as a Photographer)
    • I can offer my services for additional help and more advanced projects.(Same as a Photographer)

How Do we Apply This to Our Logo?
We base our concept on the common grounds between our customer profiles. So that if we do our job correctly it should convey what is novel, familiar and desirable.

In this case that means the theme for the logo has to be along the lines of the following:

  • It has to be personable since so much of my familiarity with these two groups is based on first hand experience.
  • It has to convey usefulness since the goal is to make the processes of the two groups easier and more affordable.
  • It has to suggest expertise and Quality since the blog is going to be giving advice.

This however creates a problem with the font we chose in part one. It may have met our font criteria, it does not convey expertise and usefulness. In fact anytime the word expertise comes to mind, I tend to avoid any ‘handwritten’ fonts.

Handsdown
Does not convey expertise and usefulness.

So Let’s review what we’ve covered so far.  In the previous post we created a criteria for our font and covered the following:

  • Identifying Key Uses For The Logo
  • Identifying Key Users For The Logo
  • Identifying Key Qualifiers For The Font
  • Search for the font that best fits the criteria.

And in this post we’ve covered the following.

Creating A Profile For Customers based on what makes them desirable, what makes the relationship familiar and what makes it novel.

In the next part of this challenge I will be creating the Emblem and putting together the final logo.

This is has been an interesting challenge, and I want to thank everyone who has been following this series. Your comments and feedback are very appreciated!

7 Replies to “How To Design Your Brand Logo [Part Two]: Creating Customer Profiles”

  1. I just found this, but I love these tips! I’m off to read part 1 as developing my brands logo is a project I just started thinking about! Thanks for sharing!

    Like

    1. Thank you! I’m really glad you found them useful! What kind of brand are you building?

      Like

      1. I have a blog (This Crazy Maze) about my quest to live naturally and parent peacefully!

        Liked by 1 person

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